Articles Posted in Criminal Law

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This blog is long overdue. In this blog I will attempt to explain the reasons that make it so difficult to get a domestic violence dropped or dismissed.

The Prosecutor Represents the People of Michigan or Municipality Where the Offense Occurred

First of all, it is important to understand that once a criminal case is pursued, the prosecutor represents the people or public at large for a specific jurisdiction. County Prosecutors have authority to pursue criminal cases on behalf of the “People of Michigan”. City or township prosecutors have authority to prosecute those that are accused of committing ordinance violations within their jurisdiction. Federal criminal cases are prosecuted by the District Attorney’s Office. For this reason, the court title of any criminal case is:

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Part 1: Introduction to felony representation and considerations when hiring a lawyer if you are accused, charged or arrested for a felony (or any other criminal matter).

Part 2: Criminal investigations, plea bargaining and actual case results based upon local practices and our extensive experience handling criminal matters in the Macomb County courts.

Part 3: We explain the terminology and proceedings associated with the criminal process to better inform the public of this process and their rights. Our publications are based upon more than 35 years of experience handling criminal matters in every Metro-Detroit court (Macomb, Oakland, Wayne and St. Clair Counties).

Felony Representation Introduction

Our attorneys have handled OVER 10,000 criminal cases since 1980. Many of those cases qualified as felony offenses. Without a doubt, we know that being accused or charged with a felony can be a life changing event.

The Difference Between Misdemeanors and Felonies

In Michigan, and according to federal law, a felony is considered a crime of high seriousness punishable by imprisonment in excess of one (1) year up to life in prison. If punishable by exactly one year or less, it is classified as a misdemeanor. However, Michigan laws contain certain offenses which are known as “high court misdemeanors” that can carry up to two (2) years imprisonment. While a high court misdemeanor looks better than a felony, it is treated as a felony under federal law and has felony implications under state law.

Clients Charged with Felonies Rarely Fit the Profile of a “Felon” or Criminal

Misunderstandings, false accusations and unintended conduct can lead to serious felony charges. In addition, ignorance of law is not a defense in a criminal prosecution. For example, we have represented clients charged with felonies in all of the following scenarios:

  • Malicious Destruction: Key scratching a car where the victim alleges $1,000.00 or more in damage
  • Felony Drug Possession: Being in possession of drug residue or an innocent passenger in a vehicle where drugs are found.
  • Maintaining a Drug House: When drugs are found in your home or property that you long forgot about or that someone else left behind.
  • Uttering & Publishing: Preparing a check that does not belong to you even though the amount involved is nominal.
  • Receiving Stolen Property: Being an innocent stolen property.
  • Assault with a Deadly Weapon: Raising an object during an argument (assault with a deadly weapon)
  • Possession of Child Porn: Accidental or intentional downloading of inappropriate images (child port)
  • CSC 4th Degree: Touching someone who claims it was a sexual contact even though not intended to be (CSC 4th Degree)
  • Drunk Driving Felony: Being charged with Felony DUI because of 2 or more prior offenses that occurred in your lifetime, even 30 years ago
  • Fleeing and Eluding: Failing to stop when signaled by a police officer to do so.
  • Resisting and Obstructing: Resisting a lawful arrest or failing to comply with a demand by a law enforcement officer.
  • Strangulation: Engaging in a struggle with another and doing an act that “impedes normal breathing” can constitute a felony known as “Assault by Strangulation” punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

Any felony offense is a serious matter. However, most of our clients finding themselves charged with a felony do not fit the profile of a criminal and have not engaged in extreme or outrageous conduct. In fact, in our publication which covers the topic of Michigan’s most frequently charged felonies, we explain that marginal conduct, such as being in possession of drug residue which not capable of being used or measured, can result in serious felony charges that can lead to a conviction! If you find yourself in this predicament, do not waste time thinking that you can handle it yourself. Saying the wrong thing to a detective may put you in a worse position without you even knowing that you did so. Fortunately, a skilled criminal defense lawyer can manage most of the above mentioned matters where a felony does not go on your record, jail is not imposed and in some cases get the charge dismissed under special provisions of Michigan law (HYTA for youthful offenders age 17-23, MCL 333.7411 for first time possession of drugs, MCL 771.1 delayed sentence). Deals under these provisions can be limited based upon the age of the offender and/or the past criminal history of the offender. However, a past criminal history does not automatically rule out a favorble plea bargain in the criminal justice system. A consultation with an attorney is often necessary to find the right strategy for each person and each unique case.

Getting an Experienced Local Attorney is the Best Fit in Most Criminal Matters: Hiring a Lawyer Does Not Make You Look Guilty!!

Contrary to what the police might suggest to you if you are being accused of a crime; hiring a lawyer does not make you look guilty. Putting the shoe on the other foot, if a cop were facing criminal accusations, you can bet that he or she would “lawyer up” faster than the speed of light. 

An experienced criminal defense lawyer is able to explain the court proceedings and set realistic goals and provide a fairly accurate prediction regarding the outcome of the case. Getting a local attorney within the county where the offense occurred is a good start. Local attorneys with experience that know the courts, the prosecutors and the police are the best fit to give predictions regarding the outcome of a criminal case and answer questions such as:

  • Is jail a possibility?
  • Can a felony record be avoided?
  • Can the felony be reduced to a lower offense or misdemeanor?
  • What terms of probation is the judge likely to impose?
  • Will I have a criminal record?
  • Should I cooperate with the police (aka: snitch, act as an informant)?
  • Do I have to talk to the police if I am contacted by the police?
  • Do I have to take a polygraph (especially when it comes to sex crimes)?
  • How much will an attorney cost?
  • How bad is it for someone with a prior criminal record?
  • What can happen if there is a warrant for my arrest?
  • How much will bond cost?
  • What is involved if the case goes to trial?
  • Can the case be dismissed completely?

Cooperation, Police Interviews: Don’t be fooled into thinking that you have all of the answers to these questions because your best friend is taking a criminal justice class or because you have a friend that is  police officer. Each case and client is unique and the answers to these questions depend upon the individual circumstances involved. For example, we are generally against cooperation (becoming an informant) when a client is not comfortable doing undercover work or can otherwise get a good deal in the court system with an attorney standing up for his rights. An experienced criminal defense lawyer can also make recommendations regarding interviews with the police and polygraph examinations. Interviews with the police are a potential trap when one is not well prepared. In most cases, the police expect the accused party to deny the allegations.  The police will use the interview for other purposes such as: establish relationships, place the accused at the crime scene, establish motives and size up the accused’s credibility.

Some Tips When You Hire a Criminal Defense Lawyer

Hiring a lawyer is not something that anyone wants to do. WE KNOW that choosing a lawyer can be overwhelming and bewildering. Here are a few practical tips that can lead to a prudent decision in hiring a qualified lawyer:

  • Does the lawyer specialize in criminal law? I would say that this is the number 1 criteria in hiring a criminal lawyer. The legal profession has moved away from the days when attorneys held themselves out to the public as “general practitioners”.  An attorney that splits his time handling practice areas outside of criminal law is rarely a good fit. Specialties exist in every area of the law such as estate planning, family law real estate and personal injury. There are hundreds of laws on the books just in the area of drunk driving alone and several thousands more covering other major practice areas.
  • How do you know if the attorney is any good? This is a tough question to answer. I have had to hire lawyers three (3) times for various non-criminal situations. The process of hiring an attorney for me was not easy. So, I realize that the decision to hire one lawyer versus another is not quite that simple.  You may have a good recommendation for a lawyer which eliminates the arduous search process for an attorney. Fortunately, the internet has become a major resource of information, ratings and reviews  about lawyers if you do not have a recommendation.  If the lawyer is well represented on the internet (credible reviews, informative website, ratings by reputable services), or if you have a good impression after speaking to the lawyer or representatives of the law firm on the phone, you next should consider scheduling a first consultation to meet the lawyer face to face. Always ask if there is any fee for the first consultation. Most attorneys, including our firm, offer a free first consultation.
  • Are attorney ratings and reviews accurate? There is no easy answer to this question. Let me start out by saying that there are lousy attorneys that have excellent ratings and reviews and there are excellent attorneys with awful ratings and reviews. There are also attorneys that do not have an internet presence, do not seek reviews and just don’t want them for whatever reasons. Ratings and reviews need to be taken in stride. How do you really know if the reviews are from real clients are just harvested from the family and friends of the attorney? For example, you should be suspicious if an attorney has 100 reviews but is his fairly new to the business or has only been licensed for a short time.  The best thing to do is to read the reviews carefully. How far back do the reviews go? Are they consistent? Are they detailed or do they seem hyped or spurious? In addition to reviews, there are a number of organizations that provide ratings of attorneys. The oldest rating organization and most credible is Martindale Hubbell which has been in existence since 1868. The highest Martindale Hubbell rating is PREEMINENT, followed by DISTINGUISHED and then followed by NOTABLE. Other rating systems are utilized by AVVO and Yelp.
  • What if the attorney has had a grievance? Anyone can file an attorney grievance against an attorney. Criminal lawyers face the most grievances because of the nature of the business and because clients will find faults with the lawyer when the case does not go as planned. The State Bar does not take action for the vast majority of grievances filed.  However, the State Bar can take disciplinary action against an attorney for major violations, such as commission of a crime, or minor violations, such as failing to communicate with a client. An attorney with a history of grievances may not be a good fit. On the other hand, just because the State Bar has taken action against an attorney does not mean that the attorney is ineffective or unqualified. Like reviews and ratings, you will need to decide whether an attorney with a prior grievance should be avoided or considered for representation.
  • Do attorneys really give phone consultations? Yes, some attorneys, not all, will discuss your case on the telephone or provide internet “chat” discussions. Phone consultations can be a good starting place in the search for a lawyer.  However, there are limitations to the amount of time and advice that can be provided on the telephone or in chat discussion scenarios. Our firm offers phone consultations subject to time constraints and other realistic considerations. In our phone consultations, we like to obtain the most pressing information: Brief client history (drugs, marriage, employment, children), Nature of the charges, Court where the case will be heard, Prior lifetime record of the accused party, Name and phone number of the detective, Whether the accused party has posted bond or is in jail.
  • What should I expect at the first consultation?  The first meeting with an attorney is an excellent opportunity to get an initial impression about the attorney, the office and the staff. For complex criminal cases, there are limitations as to the extent of time and advice that can be dispensed at your first meeting. At the very least, your attorney should be able to cover any pressing matters (acting as an informant, making a statement to the police, forfeiture of assets, setting up an arraignment, quoting a fee, visiting the client in jail). Once hired, the attorney will order your police report and dig further into the underlying case which will facilitate preparation of a solid defense.  For routine matters, an attorney is likely able to provide a thorough analysis of the case from beginning to end with coverage of: the expected outcome, whether there will be a criminal record at the conclusion of the case, the likely terms of sentence (jail/probation), the approximate fines and costs and whether there is any chance of getting the matter dismissed, reduced or amended.
  • How much will it cost to hire a lawyer for criminal case? Lawyers have several ways that they charge for their services. We have adopted a fixed flat fee policy to handle just about every type of criminal, drunk driving and traffic case. The fixed flat fee arrangement means that an exact cost is charged for legal services thus eliminating the mystery associated with hourly rates and other vague fee agreements.  Hourly rates on the other hand can be intimidating especially when an attorney cannot give a prediction or estimate as to how much time/hours the entire case will entail. In addition, attorneys that bill on an hourly basis do so for every phone call, text message, email and while they are driving to court and waiting in courtroom for the case to be called. Attorney fees will also depend upon the prior criminal history of the client, the seriousness of the offense, the time and labor required, the novelty and difficulty of the questions involved, the skill requisite to perform the legal service properly, the likelihood that the acceptance of the particular employment will preclude other employment by the lawyer, the time limitations imposed by the client or by the circumstances and the experience, reputation, and ability of the lawyer or lawyers performing the services.
  • Who is responsible for out of pocket costs and expenses associated with my case? Sometimes it is necessary to employ outside resources/services to assist in the defense of a criminal case.  The costs or expenses that are paid to outside parties for their services are referred to as out of pocket costs. Out of pocket costs are always the responsibility of the client and all attorneys will seek reimbursement accordingly. The following are examples of out of pocket costs: employing a private investigator to obtain witness statements, forensic analysis of evidence, expert witnesses, private polygraph examination and extensive costs associated with discovery, copies and postage.
  • Should I get a court appointed lawyer? The Right to Counsel in criminal proceedings is guaranteed by the 6th Amendment to the United States Constitution. Should you be charged with a crime and unable to afford an attorney, the court will appoint an attorney to provide representation. Some attorneys are willing to accept court appointed cases. You do not get to choose your court appointed attorney. The court will select an attorney from a list or the matter will be referred to Macomb County Judicial Aide for handling.

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Part 1: Introduction to felony representation and considerations when hiring a lawyer if you are accused, charged or arrested for a felony (or any other criminal matter).

Part 2: Criminal investigations, plea bargaining and actual case results based upon local practices and our extensive experience handling criminal matters in the Macomb County courts.

Part 3: We explain the terminology and proceedings associated with the criminal process to better inform the public of this process and their rights. Our publications are based upon more than 35 years of experience handling criminal matters in every Metro-Detroit court (Macomb, Oakland, Wayne and St. Clair Counties).

The outcome of a felony is dependent upon a number of variables. The local practices of the prosecutor and the judge are a few of those variables. For example, our criminal caseload is comprised of matters (misdemeanors and felonies) which arise in the Metro-Detroit (Macomb, Oakland, Wayne and St. Clair) with the majority of cases in the following Macomb County courts:

Macomb County District Courts:

  • 37th District: (Warren, Centerline) 8300 Common Rd, Warren, MI 48093
  • 38th District: (Eastpointe) 16101 E 9 Mile Rd, Eastpointe, MI 48021
  • 39th District: (Roseville, Fraser) 29733 Gratiot Ave, Roseville, MI 48066
  • 40th District: (St. Clair Shores) 27701 Jefferson Ave, St Clair Shores, MI 48081
  • 41-A District: (Sterling Heights) 40111 Dodge Park Road, Sterling Heights, MI 48313
  • 41-A District: (Shelby Township, Macomb Township, Utica) 51660 Van Dyke, Shelby Charter Township, MI 48316
  • 41-B District: (Harrison Township, Clinton Township, Mt. Clemens) 22380 Starks Drive, Clinton Township, MI 48038
  • 42-1 District: (Romeo, Washington Township, Richmond, Ray, Bruce, Armada)  14713 33 Mile, Romeo, MI 48065
  • 42-2 District: (New Baltimore, Chesterfield Township, Lenox, New Haven) 35071 23 Mile Rd, New Baltimore, MI 48047

Almost anyone charged with a felony is mostly concerned about their criminal record and the possibility of jail time. First of all, let me say that a felony conviction does not automatically mean jail time. In fact, most felony crimes can be managed where the person will be placed on probation and not placed in jail. This is especially true for offenders who do not have any prior criminal record. There is even hope for those with a prior criminal history to get plea bargains and avoid jail. In addition, we have had a high success rate in getting felony cases resolved where there is no felony record by getting the charges reduced to misdemeanors or dismissed under special provisions of Michigan laws.

Felony Procedure: Cases begin with an investigation

An investigation may be instituted with the police which later results in a felony warrant. A warrant may be issued without you knowing it or you may be arrested for a crime that is reported or witnessed by the police. If you are being accused of crime or the subject of an investigation, GET A LAWYER. An arrest on the other hand is not usually planned so having a lawyer at the moment you are arrested is not probable. However, GETTING A LAWYER as soon as you are able to do so is essential.

Plea Bargaining: Good or bad?

Plea bargaining (negotiating a plea agreement) is a process that occurs in criminal cases between the defense attorney and the prosecutor whereby an agreement is made to amend/lower/dismiss the charges.   The defense attorney’s goal in plea bargaining is to get the charges lowered as much as possible and for leniency in the court system.

Plea bargaining can occur during a criminal investigation, or at any time after criminal charges are instituted in the court system. It can also occur during trial proceedings or at any time before a jury returns a verdict.

Not just in Michigan, but in every court in the United States, resolution of criminal cases is dominated by plea bargaining. The United States Justice Department estimates that 90% or more of all criminal cases are resolved by plea bargaining. Based upon our experience, this holds true for the criminal cases that are handled in the Macomb County courts.

So is plea bargaining good or bad? For the most part, plea bargaining has many advantages that can lead to a favorable disposition of a criminal case and avoid exposure to a guilty verdict at trial on the original charges. Plea bargaining can depend on the policy of the prosecutor and the effectiveness and skill of a well prepared criminal defense lawyer that knows the system. Plea bargaining can be used as vital defense tool at any stage of the criminal proceedings to:

  • Obtain sentencing under a special provision of law where a dismissal is eventually granted.
  • Avoid a felony conviction by reducing a felony a misdemeanor.
  • Have multiple charges dismissed or consolidated into  single charge.
  • Get a felony lowered to escape sentencing under higher felony sentence guidelines.
  • Obtain an agreement that other possible criminal investigations will not result in prosecution.
  • Avoid a crime that results in loss of driver’s license.
  • Avoid conviction to a crime that carries a mandatory jail sentence.
  • Avoid conviction to a crime that requires Sex Offender Registration.
  • Retain rights to own or possess firearms by avoiding a felony conviction.

Here are some examples of cases that our firm has handled that resulted in a favorable plea bargain or a dismissal in the early stage of criminal proceedings:

  • Sterling Heights/Embezzlement: Our client had authority to handle her friend’s financial affairs. The friend died and his family members were seeking criminal charges against her for larceny and/or embezzlement as a trustee. However, our firm spoke with the detective regarding her relationship and explained that she had authority to pay bills and have access to the finances of her friend. Criminal charges were not filed.
  • Roseville/False Pretenses: A landlord contacted our office about a possible criminal charge of “false pretenses” being investigated by the Macomb County Prosecutor’s Office. Apparently, the landlord took a deposit on a rental property but rented out the property to another person. Although there were many misunderstandings in this case, our recommendation to our client was to provide a total refund of the deposit to avoid a felony charge, legal fees and potential guilty verdict. Criminal charges were not filed.
  • Shelby Township/Home Invasion: An exceptional result was achieved for our client who was charged with home invasion in the 41-A District Court. Since this case involved a victim of a crime, our client needed to show appropriate remorse. In addition, we were able to make full restitution to the victim for before the Court date. The felony charge was reduced to a misdemeanor which will be dismissed if our client stays out of trouble for one (1) year.
  • Clinton Township/Felony Drunk Driving: Our client was charged with felony drunk driving (3rd offense). In 2010, we were able to reduce the drunk driving felony, which could carry a maximum of 5 years in prison, to a misdemeanor offense in the 41-B District Court with no jail. The Court was impressed with the fact that our client was proactive by attending a substance abuse counseling program and several AA meetings.
  • Clinton Township/CSC 4th Degree: Our client admitted to inappropriate touching of a female friend. He made a confession to the police (without a lawyer) which resulted in criminal charges. He told the police that he thought he had consent from the victim. Our firm held the preliminary examination and introduced evidence which persuaded the prosecutor to reduce the sex crime to simple misdemeanor assault and battery before trial.
  • Macomb Juvenile/False Threat of Terrorism: We have handled several cases involving false threats of terrorism. In 2018, we were able to have 2 of our cases handled on the “consent calendar” which will result in a dismissal and NO record after a period of probation. In getting the prosecutor’s approval, we submitted numerous character letters beforehand. We also had our clients obtain a psychological evaluation to rule out any propensity for violent or predatory conduct.
  • Warren/Resisting Police: In 2011, our client was charged with resisting and obstructing after he consumed various drugs and was confronted by the police. On the date of the preliminary examination in the 37th District Court, we negotiated a reduction of the felony to a misdemeanor, attempt fleeing and eluding. The court agreed to delay the sentence and dismiss the offense if the person complies with the terms of his probation which include random drug testing.
  • St. Clair Shores/Tampering with Evidence: Our client was a precious metals dealer who was charged with tampering with evidence, a felony which can carry up to 4 years in prison. The prosecutor’s case, along with our possible defenses, had some weakness. We eventually negotiated a misdemeanor plea in the 40th District Court with no probation; thereby meeting our client’s goal to avoid a felony conviction.

Plea bargaining is not without its critics and flaws. Those that are impoverished or cannot afford trial are especially vulnerable to accepting a plea bargain. In addition, plea bargaining favors the prosecutor in cases where the prosecutor engages in overcharging and offers to dismiss charges in exchange for a guilty plea to others. Similarly, prosecutors may threaten to raise the charge to one that carries a higher penalty should a defendant not enter into  a plea bargain. Unfortunately, we have seen all of these abuses occur in the criminal justice system. But for the most part, plea bargaining remains an excellent tool in the arsenal of defense attorneys that know how to utilize the process in favor of their clients. Continue Reading

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A Qualified DUI Lawyer Should Know the Law and the Science

Qualified DUI lawyers know the laws and the science that can make the difference in the defense of a DUI case. On the legal side, there are hundreds of complex laws, administrative rules, rules of evidence and trial procedure that are involved in the defense of a DUI case. An understanding of the science requires a working knowledge of alcohol and drug interaction with the body.

In this publication, we key in on aspects of the law and the science that comes into play with respect to DUI testing.

Michigan’s Implied Consent Law: Testing for drugs or alcohol if suspected of operating under the influence

Under Michigan’s Implied Consent Law, all persons with a Michigan driver’s license are considered to have given their consent to submit to testing upon the request of a law enforcement officer. Blood, breath or urine chemical tests are utilized to determine blood alcohol content (BAC) or the presence of drugs. Positive test results for illegal drugs, marijuana and prescribed medications are all fair game to support a charge of “operating under the influence of drugs” or “operating while impaired”.  Commonly, the police utilize the breathalyzer to determine a person’s BAC. If a person is extremely inebriated or incapacitated, a blood draw at a medical facility is often utilized and also to allow for medical treatment and detoxification if deemed necessary.

Michigan’s Implied Consent Law pertains to the chemical test offered by the police when you are arrested for a drinking or drugged while driving offense, such as:

  • Zero Tolerance for those Under Age 21 Operating with a BAC of .02 – .07
  • Operating while Intoxicated (OWI), BAC .08 or more
  • Operating with a High Blood Alcohol Content – BAC .17 or more (Super DUI)
  • Operating with any Presence of Drugs (OWPD) (cocaine, heroin, marijuana)
  • Operating Under the Influence of Other Drugs, including prescribed medications
  • Operating while Impaired

Michigan Drunk Driving Laws make the offenses of Zero tolerance (.02-.07), OWI (.08 or more) and Operating with a High BAC (.17 or more) presumptive crimes whereby intoxication is presumed based solely upon blood alcohol content, regardless of actual intoxication.

Search Warrant for Blood Test: If you refuse the chemical test offered by the police, the police may obtain a search warrant for a blood test. If a search warrant for blood is approved, you will be transported to a facility, such as a hospital, for a blood draw by a qualified person.

Your Right to a Second Test: If you take the test offered by the police, you are entitled to request a second test of your own choosing and expense. This right to a second test of your choice is forfeited if you have refused the test offered by the police. In some cases, a second test may be used as evidence to refute the first test obtained by law enforcement officers.

Sanctions for Refusal: If you refuse a test, six (6) points will be added to your driver record license will be suspended for one year. A suspension of a license, or non-resident operating privilege, is automatic for any refusal to submit to the test. This is a separate consequence from any subsequent convictions resulting from the traffic stop or drinking and driving charge. If you are arrested a second time in seven (7) years and again unreasonably refuse the test, six (6) points will be added to your driver record and your license will be suspended for two years. If you refuse to take the test under the Michigan Implied Consent Law, or if the test shows your BAC is 0.08 or more (Operating While Intoxicated) your Michigan driver’s license will be destroyed by the officer and a 625g paper permit to drive will be issued until further action by the State of Michigan as to your license.

Appeal Rights: The Implied Consent suspension may be appealed to the Driver Assessment and Appeal Division (DAAD). The request for hearing must be mailed within 14 days of the date of arrest or your operator’s or chauffeur’s license and vehicle group designation or operating privilege will be automatically suspended without a hearing. You are entitled to have an attorney present for this hearing. However, if you lose at this hearing, you have a right to appeal a first time implied consent suspension to the circuit court where the offense occurred and request a restricted license based upon hardship and need. You may also appeal based upon the merits of the decision of the DAAD hearing officer.

The Science of Blood Alcohol Content: Consumption, Absorption and Elimination

Both math and chemistry are at play in the determination of blood alcohol content (BAC).  Alcohol consumption is the first step in the process of alcohol entering the human body.  After taking a drink, alcohol first enters the digestive system. From the digestive system, it is absorbed into the blood. The process of elimination occurs over time whereby alcohol is dissipated from the blood. Alcohol absorption and elimination are influenced by several factors including weight, sex, metabolism, medications and consumption of food. For purposes of calculating blood alcohol content (BAC), most graphs consider a standard drink to be equal to:

  • Wine: 5 ounces with 12% alcohol content
  • Beer: 12 ounces with 5% alcohol content
  • Liquor: 1.5 ounces with 40% alcohol content (80 proof)

Alcohol testing (in connection with DUI cases) is accomplished by testing the blood, breath or urine of an individual. Analysis of blood is a direct method of testing for alcohol, while breath and urine tests are indirect methods. Alcohol graphs take three (3) major factors into consideration for purposes of estimating blood alcohol content (BAC). Those factors are number of drinks (based upon the above measurements) the body weight and the gender of the individual.

Gender: In general, women have less body water than men of similar body weight, so the result is higher concentrations of alcohol in the blood after drinking. In addition, women have a higher concentration of body fat than men. Body fat does not absorb alcohol, which results in a higher concentration of alcohol in the bloodstream as well.

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Absorption: The process of alcohol being absorbed into the blood from the digestive system can occur over a period of 30 to 60 minutes but can take up to 2 hours. The recent consumption of food prior to drinking alcoholic beverages can slow down the rate of absorption. In addition, the absorption rate is faster when higher alcohol content beverages are consumed.

Elimination: Like absorption, time is the major factor which has an influence on the elimination of alcohol from the blood. The average elimination rate for most drinkers is .010 to .015 per hour. Consumption of water does not have an impact on the elimination rate of alcohol. Ninety (90%) of alcohol is broken down or eliminated by the liver. The remainder is eliminated by breath, sweat and urine.

CLICK HERE: For additional information on the topic of alcohol absorption and elimination.

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41-A District Courts: 2 Courts Cover 108 Square Miles of Macomb County

Jurisdiction of the 41-A Districts: Sterling Heights, Shelby Township, Macomb Township, Utica

The 41-A District Court corridor encompasses the cities of Sterling Heights, Utica, Shelby Township and Macomb Township. These areas are in a period of strong economic growth and expansion. In these areas you will find industry, major retail shopping centers, Jimmy John’s Field, 7 Class A high schools, numerous bars and restaurants.  In this area you will also find the M-53 Expressway, Hall Road and other major roads which handle a massive amount of local, commuter and connector traffic. These areas have a reputation for being safe places to live and visit. However, the 41-A District Courts cover a huge area, growing population and a high volume of criminal, drunk driving and traffic matters on their dockets as I will discuss in this publication.

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MACOMB COUNTY DISTRICT COURT MAP

STERLING HEIGHTS DIVISION: 41-A District: 40111 Dodge Park, Sterling Heights, Michigan 48313:  The Sterling Heights Division of the 41-A District Court covers an area of 36 square miles with its borders from 14 Mile Road to Hall Road, and its east to west borders from Hayes to Dequindre Road. According to 2010 census records, the City of Sterling Heights has a population of approximately 130,00. The Sterling Heights court docket is managed by 3 elected judges. The Honorable Michael S. Maceroni, Stephen P. Sierawski and Kimberly A. Wiegand have long held these positions.

SHELBY TOWNSHIP DIVISION: 41-A District Court: 51660 Van Dyke, Shelby Township, Michigan 48316: The Shelby Township Division of the 41-A District Court also covers a 72 square mile area with jurisdiction over criminal, drunk driving and traffic cases that occur within Shelby Township, Macomb Township and the City of Utica.  Shelby Township and Utica have their own police departments. Macomb Township utilizes the Macomb County Sheriff Department to patrol its roads and provide law enforcement services. There is only 1 elected judge appropriated to the Shelby Township Division of the 41-A District which encompasses jurisdiction over a population of approximately 160,000. This is somewhat of an anomaly given the fact that 3 judges are assigned to the Sterling Heights Division which has a significantly lesser population and is half the size geographically. The Honorable Douglas P. Shepherd presides over the Shelby Township Division of the 41-A District Court. A new court building, which is long overdue, has been recently approved for the Shelby Township Division of the 41-A District Court.

Criminal Cases in the 41-A District Courts: Provisions of Law to Get Dismissals Available!

Our firm has represented clients charged with just about every imaginable misdemeanor and  felony crime in the 41-A District Courts. The following is list of some of the most prevalent cases that we regularly see on the 41-A District Courts dockets in both Sterling Heights and Shelby Divisions:

Getting out on bond, bond conditions: If you are arrested or arraigned on a criminal matter in the 41- A District Courts, you will appear either before a magistrate or judge.  Insofar as possible, it is always advisable to have an attorney present for arraignment purposes. An attorney can make a considerable difference at arraignment by advocating for a personal bond (where no money needs to be posted) or a for a low cash/10% bond arrangement. Most judges will listen to an attorney’s remarks regarding bond which can save potentially thousands of dollars that a bondsman would otherwise take.  In addition to the cash component of bond, the Court can also impose bond conditions upon a person’s release from jail. Drug and alcohol testing are common bond conditions for those charged with any crime involving drugs or alcohol. A ‘no-contact order‘ is assured in assault cases, domestic violence, sex crimes and all other crimes involving a victim. In retail fraud cases, the accused party may be instructed to refrain from entering the establishment where the alleged shoplifting occurred. A motion for a hearing can always be filed to modify bond conditions, remove a no-contact order or eliminate travel restrictions.

Misdemeanor or Felony Classification: In Michigan, the district courts have full jurisdiction to dispose of misdemeanors through sentencing. A misdemeanor is classified as an offense that carries up to 1 year in jail.  Felony cases are another matter. A felony is classified as a crime that can carry more than 1 year in jail. A felony case is initiated in the district court for the arraignment, probable cause conference and preliminary examination. A felony that is not resolved in the district court will be moved to the circuit court for further proceedings. In certain cases, a felony can be reduced to a misdemeanor and can remain in the district court. Accomplishing reduction of a felony to a misdemeanor, thus avoiding a felony conviction, is considered a huge victory.

The outcome of a criminal case in the 41-A District Courts, as well as other Macomb County District Courts, is dependent upon many components.  The most significant factors that can have a bearing on a case are:

  • The prior criminal history of the accused party.
  • Whether another party was injured or property was damaged.
  • Whether the accused party can provide restitution for damages to the injured party.
  • Whether the offense is a ‘policy case’ (crimes against senior citizens, children).

In our experience, criminal cases can be resolved favorably at the 41-A District Courts. Whenever possible, the judges in both divisions will accept dispositions to allow an offender the opportunity to get a dismissal under these special provisions of law: HYTA for youthful offenders (age 17 to 23), MCL 333.7411 for first time drug offenders and MCL 769.a for domestic violence. The court will also utilize a provision of law known as a deferral or delayed sentence which allows an offender leniency or a dismissal after a period of probation. Even individuals that have a prior criminal record will be given respect and consideration for plea deals to get a dismissal under certain circumstances.

Drunk Driving Cases in the 41-A District Courts: 215 DUI cases in 2016

Hall Road (M-59), M-53, Van Dyke, Dequindre, Schoenherr and Hayes are just a few of the major roads that are within the 108 square miles of the 41-A District Court’s territory. Statistics for 2016 reveal a high number of drunk driving arrests in this region with approximately 170 arrests in Shelby Township, 60 arrests in Utica and 193 arrests in Sterling Heights. Over 120 of the test results in Shelby Township and Sterling Heights alone registered a blood alcohol content of .17 or greater to support a charge of ‘Super DUI‘ or ‘OWI with a high BAC’.

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APPROXIMATE BLOOD ALCOHOL CONTENT (BAC) CHART

1st offense drinking and driving:  For most first time drinking and driving offenders, jail is not likely absent some other aggravating circumstances in the 38th and 39th District Courts. A person without any prior drinking and driving offenses can expect to get an OWI reduced to ‘operating while impaired’. It is extremely difficult and rare, but not impossible, to get a drinking and driving offense reduced to a non-criminal offense. In addition to probation, a person convicted for a first drinking and driving offense (operating while impaired) is looking at:

  • Probation for 1 year or less
  • Fines and costs approximately $1,200.00
  • Restricted license for 90 days
  • Attend an alcohol or substance abuse program (discretionary)
  • Possible drug testing, alcohol testing, AA meetings (discretionary)
  • 4 points on driving record

Super Drunk Driving: If a person is charged with Super DUI (BAC .17 or greater) a deviation may need to be filed to get a plea bargain to a lower offense. Super DUI convictions will result in mandatory license suspension for 45 days followed by a restricted license for a period of 320 days with the requirement of a vehicle breathalyzer ignition interlock device (BAIID). The Court can also order installation of an ignition interlock system on any vehicle driven by a person convicted of any drinking and driving offense.

Repeat DUI Offender: A repeat drinking and driving offender may be looking at a longer period of probation, up to 2 years, with the possibility of some jail time.  There are many steps that we can recommend to those charged with a repeat offense to reduce the likelihood of incarceration in almost every Macomb County court.

Third Lifetime DUI = Felony: DUI 3rd is a felony/with a maximum penalty of 1-5 years in prison.  Felony matters begin in the district court and can remain in the district court for purpose of sentencing and probation if reduced to a misdemeanor. Felonies that are not resolved in the district court are handled in the Circuit Court after the probable cause conference or preliminary examination. We evaluate every DUI 3rd for opportunities to get it reduced to a misdemeanor by filing strategic legal motions, negotiations and filing a deviation request.

The 41-A District Court Probation Department: 40111 Dodge Park, Sterling Heights, Michigan 48313

The 41-A District Courts share the probation department located at the Sterling Heights Division. I expect the Shelby Township Division to have its own probation department once the new court building is up and running.

It is within the judge’s discretion whether or not to place an individual on probation after being convicted of a criminal or drunk driving offense. In many cases that qualify as isolated incidents, we may be able to convince the judge that probation, also known as community supervision, is not necessary. When probation is imposed, the judge may require reporting or non-reporting probation.  The maximum period of probation that can be imposed in the district courts is 2 years. However, our experience is that probation is rarely imposed for more than 1 year for most first time offenders.

Traffic Violations in the 41-A District Court: Reduced to Avoid Points and Record of any Conviction!

The Sterling Heights Police, Shelby Township Police, Utica Police, Macomb County Sheriff Department and Michigan State Police all have an active presence monitoring the activity of vehicular traffic within the 108 square miles of the 41-A District Courts.  Similar to other districts, I would say that traffic tickets are on the top of the list of cases that are litigated at the 41-A District Court.


HALL-ROAD-MAP

Shelby Township, Utica, Macomb Township and Sterling Heights share roads with the heavy traffic volume in Macomb County

When resolving a traffic matter in the 41-A District Courts, we are often able to negotiate a reduction or avoid points. A substantial reduction in a traffic ticket occurs when it is reduced to an offense such as impeding traffic or double parking. A traffic ticket that is reduced to impeding traffic or double parking does not carry any points and will never appear on a person’s driving record! We are also able to get favorable results for individuals charged with misdemeanor traffic offenses such as driving while suspended, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident.

Court Personnel are Forbidden to Give Legal Advice: Yet most courts are making it easier than ever to just pay your traffic ticket by visiting the court’s website and giving offenders the convenient option to pay by credit card.  What they won’t tell you on their website is that you will get points on your driving record and that you may will wind up with higher insurance premiums for several years. Unfortunately, most individuals that receive a traffic ticket do not hire a lawyer. The path of least resistance, paying the ticket, can be much costlier in the long run.

Link to Sterling Heights Points and Fine Schedule

Link to Shelby Township Points and Fine Schedule

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The 41B District Court located at 22380 Starks Drive, Clinton Township, Michigan 48038, phone: 586-469-9300.  It has jurisdiction to handle civil, traffic and criminal cases arising in Clinton Township, Harrison Township and Mount Clemens. Clinton Township has its own police department while Harrison Township and Mount Clemens are policed by the Macomb County Sheriff’s Department. The Court is served by Judge Sebastian Lucido, Judge Linda Davis and Judge Carrie Lynn Fuca.

As I state in this publication, it is my opinion based upon several years of experience, that the 41B District Court will give a person a second chance and has a philosophy to encourage rehabilitation rather than impose jail. 

41B District Court has an expansive jurisdiction that covers Macomb County from Lake St. Clair in Harrison Township to Hayes Road on the Sterling Heights border, and from 14 Mile Road to Hall Road. The area has a diverse mixture of established and newer real estate, shopping centers, Macomb County Community College, county government offices and the Partridge Creek Mall. The Macomb County Sheriff’s Department and the Clinton Township Police are the predominant law enforcement agencies in the area.

Criminal Cases in the 41B District Court: Provisions of Law to Get Dismissals Available!

The 41B District gets a wide range of the criminal cases that occur within Macomb County.  Our firm has represented clients charged with just about every imaginable misdemeanor and  felony crime in the 41B District Court. The following is list of some of the most prevalent cases that we regularly see on the 41B District Court’s docket:

Getting out on bond, bond conditions: If you are arrested or arraigned on a criminal matter in the 41B District Court, you will appear either before a magistrate or judge.  Insofar as possible, it is always advisable to have an attorney present for arraignment purposes. An attorney can make a considerable difference at an arraignment hearing by advocating for a personal bond (where no money needs to be posted) or a for a low cash/10% bond arrangement. I have found that the judges and the magistrate will listen to an attorney’s remarks regarding bond which can save potentially thousands of dollars that a bondsman would otherwise take.  In addition to the cash component of bond, the Court can also impose bond conditions upon a person’s release from jail. Drug and alcohol testing are common bond conditions for those charged with any crime involving drugs or alcohol. A ‘no-contact order‘ is assured in assault cases, domestic violence, sex crimes and all other crimes involving a victim. In retail fraud cases, the accused party may be instructed to refrain from entering the establishment where the alleged shoplifting occurred. A motion for a hearing can always be filed to modify bond conditions, remove a no-contact order or eliminate travel restrictions.

Misdemeanor or Felony Classification: In Michigan, the district courts have full jurisdiction to dispose of misdemeanors through sentencing. A misdemeanor is classified as an offense that carries up to 1 year in jail.  Felony cases are another matter. A felony is classified as a crime that can carry more than 1 year in jail. A felony case is initiated in the district court for the arraignment, probable cause conference and preliminary examination. A felony that is not resolved in the district court will be moved to the circuit court for further proceedings. In certain cases, a felony can be reduced to a misdemeanor and can remain in the district court. Accomplishing reduction of a felony to a misdemeanor, thus avoiding a felony conviction, is considered a huge victory.

The outcome of a criminal case in the 41B District Courts, as well as other Macomb County District Courts, is dependent upon many components.  The most significant factors that can have a bearing on the disposition of a case are:

  • Prior criminal history of the accused party.
  • Cooperation with the police.
  • Whether another party was injured, or property was damaged.
  • The ability of the accused party to provide restitution for damages to the injured party.
  • Whether the offense is a ‘policy case’ (crimes against senior citizens, children).

In our experience, criminal cases can be resolved favorably at the 41B District Court. All these special provisions of law are possible in the 41-B District Court which can result in a dismissal of a criminal matter:

  • HYTA for youthful offenders (age 17 to 23)
  •  MCL 333.7411 for first time drug offenders
  • MCL 769.a for domestic violence.
  • Delayed Sentence or Deferral

Drunk Driving Cases in the 41B District Court

1st offense drinking and driving: The 41B District Court is known for imposing hefty fines and costs for first time drinking and driving offenders.  For most first time drinking and driving offenders, jail is not likely in the 41B District Court absent some other aggravating circumstances. A person without any prior drinking and driving offenses can expect to get an OWI reduced to ‘operating while impaired‘ in the 41B District. It is extremely difficult and rare, but not impossible, to get a drinking and driving offense reduced to a non-criminal offense. Non-reporting probation, reporting probation and counseling may also be imposed depending upon the circumstances. Those with a history of alcohol or substance abuse, or that register a high blood alcohol content (BAC), can expect a longer period of counseling. Fortunately, the judges in the 41B District Court have a sentencing philosophy that encourages rehabilitation rather than incarceration.  In addition to probation, a person convicted for a first drinking and driving offense (operating while impaired) is looking at:

  • Probation for 1 year or less
  • Fines and costs approximately $1,500.00
  • Restricted license for 90 days
  • Attend an alcohol or substance abuse program
  • Possible drug testing, alcohol testing, AA meetings
  • 4 points on driving record

There are other mandatory and discretionary sanctions associated with a drinking and driving conviction including: driver responsibility fees, probation oversight expenses and vehicle immobilization. The Court can also order installation of an ignition interlock system on any vehicle driven by a person convicted of a drinking and driving offense.

If a person is charged with Super DUI (BAC .17 or greater) a deviation may need to be filed to get a plea bargain to a lower offense. In 2016, there were approximately 140 arrests for operating while intoxicated related offenses in Clinton Township and 50 registered a BAC of .17 or more.

A repeat drinking and driving offender may be looking at a longer period of probation, up to 2 years, with the possibility of some jail time.  There are many steps that we can recommend to those charged with a repeat offense to reduce the likelihood of incarceration in almost every Macomb County District Court.

The 41-B District Court Probation Department: 22380 Starks Drive, Clinton Township, Michigan 48038

The 41-B District Court has its own probation department located inside of the courthouse.

It is within the judge’s discretion whether to place an individual on probation after being convicted of a criminal or drunk driving offense. When probation is imposed, the judge may require reporting or non-reporting probation.  The maximum period of probation that can be imposed in the district courts is 2 years.

Isolated Incidents, Not Likely to Re-offend: There are many instances where we have advocated for ZERO probation, or for an abbreviated period of probation, on behalf of clients that are not likely to re-offend.

Traffic Violations in the 41B District Court: Reduced to Avoid Points and Record of any Conviction!

Like other district courts in Macomb County, I would say that traffic tickets are on the top of the list of types of cases that are litigated at the 41B District Court. Gratiot Avenue, Metro Parkway, a stretch of I-94 and Hall Road all contribute to the traffic volume in the 41B District Court.  When resolving a traffic matter in the 41B District Court, we are often able to negotiate a reduction or avoid points. A substantial reduction in a traffic ticket occurs when it is reduced to an offense such as impeding traffic or double parking. A traffic ticket that is reduced to impeding traffic or double parking does not carry any points and will never appear on a person’s driving record! We are also able to get favorable results for individuals charged with misdemeanor traffic offenses such as driving while suspended, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident

The court staff and judicial officers are forbidden by law to provide you with legal advice. Yet many courts are now making it easier than ever to just pay your traffic ticket by visiting the court’s website and conveniently providing an option to pay by credit card.  Unfortunately, most individuals that receive a traffic ticket do not hire a lawyer and wind up with a record and points that will have an impact on insurance premiums for several years. The path of least resistance, paying the ticket, can be much costlier in the long run.  Another publication by our firm explains why you should fight every traffic ticket.

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St. Clair Shores is a suburban community bordering along Lake St. Clair from 8 Mile Road to 14 Mile Road. The 40th District Court has jurisdiction over legal matters that arise in the City of St. Clair Shores including:

  • Criminal misdemeanor offenses (domestic violence, retail fraud, possession marijuana, DWLS)
  • Misdemeanor Drunk Driving (OWI, OWI with High BAC .17 or More)
  • Traffic offenses
  • Felony offenses through preliminary examination (after preliminary examination, felony cases are handled in the Macomb County Circuit Court)

The 40th District Court is located on the corner of 11 Mile Road and Jefferson: 27701 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, Michigan 48081, Phone: 586-445-5280. Honorable Mark A. Fratarcangeli and Honorable Joseph Craigen Oster presiding.

St. Clair Shores: Nautical Mile, I-94, I-696

St. Clair Shores is best known for its several miles of coastline on Lake St. Clair. The lake is a big draw for recreation and for many that choose to live in St. Clair Shores. The area has a reputation for its charm and being a safe place to live. I can confirm these attributes since St. Clair Shores is my hometown.

Most of the recreational activity in St. Clair Shores arises in a dedicated zone known as the Nautical Mile. The Nautical Mile in St. Clair Shores, located on Jefferson from 9 Mile Road to 10 Mile Road,  is a Michigan landmark which consists of numerous restaurants, marinas and boat dealers along a one mile stretch of land along the Lake St. Clair shoreline.

The City of St. Clair Shores has its own police department. The interstate expressways in St. Clair Shores, I-94 and I-696, are watched by the Michigan State Police.

Criminal Cases in the 40th District Courts: Provisions of Law to Get Dismissals Available!

Our firm has represented clients charged with just about every imaginable misdemeanor and  felony crime in the 40th  District Court. The following is list of some of the most prevalent cases that we regularly see on the 40th District Court’s docket:

 The 40th District Court keeps close tabs on the community to insure safe streets and recreational enjoyment. I would say that both judges take a ‘hands on’ approach to their cases. They use alcohol and drug testing extensively to monitor individuals that are on bond or convicted of an alcohol or drug related offense. Jail is a probable option for those that violate probation in the 40th District Court.

Getting out on bond, bond conditions: If you are arrested or arraigned on a criminal matter in the 40th District Court, you will appear either before a magistrate or judge.  Insofar as possible, it is always advisable to have an attorney present for arraignment purposes. An attorney can make a considerable difference at an arraignment hearing by advocating for a personal bond (where no money needs to be posted) or a for a low cash/10% bond arrangement. I have found that Judge Oster, Judge Fratarcangeli and the magistrate will listen to an attorney’s remarks regarding bond which can save potentially thousands of dollars that a bondsman would otherwise cost.  In addition to the cash component of bond, the Court can also impose bond conditions upon a person’s release from jail. Drug and alcohol testing are common bond conditions for those charged with any crime involving drugs or alcohol. A ‘no-contact order‘ is assured in assault cases, domestic violence, sex crimes and all other crimes involving a victim. In retail fraud cases, the accused party may be instructed to refrain from entering the establishment where the alleged shoplifting occurred. A motion for a hearing can always be filed to modify bond conditions, remove a no-contact order or eliminate travel restrictions.

Misdemeanor or Felony Classification: In Michigan, the district courts have full jurisdiction to dispose of misdemeanors through sentencing. A misdemeanor is classified as an offense that carries up to 1 year in jail.  Felony cases are another matter. A felony is classified as a crime that can carry more than 1 year in jail. A felony case is initiated in the district court for the arraignment, probable cause conference and preliminary examination. A felony that is not resolved in the district court will be moved to the circuit court for further proceedings. In certain cases, a felony can be reduced to a misdemeanor and can remain in the district court. Accomplishing reduction of a felony to a misdemeanor, thus avoiding a felony conviction, is considered a huge victory.

The outcome of a criminal case in the 40th District Courts, as well as other Macomb County District Courts, is dependent upon many components.  The most significant factors that can have a bearing on the disposition of a case are:

  • Prior criminal history of the accused party.
  • Cooperation with the police.
  • Whether another party was injured, or property was damaged.
  • The ability of the accused party to provide restitution for damages to the injured party.
  • Whether the offense is a ‘policy case’ (crimes against senior citizens, children).

In our experience, criminal cases can be resolved favorably at the 40th District Court. All these special provisions of law are possible in the 40th District Court which can result in a dismissal of a criminal matter:

Drunk Driving Cases in the 40th District Court

For most first time drinking and driving offenders, jail is not likely in the 40th District Court absent some other aggravating circumstances. A person without any prior drinking and driving offenses can expect to get an OWI reduced to ‘operating while impaired’ in the 40th District. It is both extremely difficult and rare, but not impossible, to get a drinking and driving offense reduced to a non-criminal offense. If a person is charged with Super DUI (BAC .17 or greater) a deviation may need to be filed to get a plea bargain to a lower offense. In 2016, there were approximately 100 arrests for operating while intoxicated related offenses in St. Clair Shores and 42 registered a .17 or more.

1st offense drinking and driving:  For most first time drinking and drivingoffenders, jail is not likely absent some other aggravating circumstances in the 40thDistrict Court. A person without any prior drinking and driving offenses can expect to get an OWI reduced to ‘operating while impaired’. It is extremely difficult and rare, but not impossible, to get a drinking and driving offense reduced to a non-criminal offense. In addition to probation, a person convicted for a first drinking and driving offense (operating while impaired) is looking at:

  • Probation for 1 year or less
  • Fines and costs approximately $1,200.00
  • Restricted license for 90 days
  • Attend an alcohol or substance abuse program (discretionary)
  • Possible drug testing, alcohol testing, AA meetings (discretionary)
  • 4 points on driving record

Super Drunk Driving: If a person is charged with Super DUI (BAC .17 or greater) a deviation may need to be filed to get a plea bargain for a lower offense. Super DUI convictions will result in mandatory license suspension for 45 days followed by a restricted license for a period of 320 days with the requirement of a vehicle breathalyzer ignition interlock device (BAIID). The Court can also order installation of an ignition interlock system on any vehicle driven by a person convicted of any drinking and driving offense, not just a Super DUI.

Repeat DUI Offender: A repeat drinking and driving offender may be looking at a longer period of probation, up to 2 years, with the possibility of some jail time.  There are many steps that we can recommend to those charged with a repeat offense to reduce the likelihood of incarceration in almost every court.

Third Lifetime DUI = Felony: DUI 3rd is a felony/with a maximum penalty of 1-5 years in prison.  Felony matters begin in the district court and can remain in the district court for purpose of sentencing and probation ONLY if reduced to a misdemeanor. Felonies that are not resolved in the district court are handled in the Circuit Court after the probable cause conference or preliminary examination. Click here for more information on felony procedure.

The 40th District Court Probation Department: 27701 Jefferson, St. Clair Shores, Michigan 48081

The 40th District Court has its own probation department located inside of the courthouse.

It is within the judge’s discretion whether to place an individual on probation after being convicted of a criminal or drunk driving offense. When probation is imposed, the judge may require reporting or non-reporting probation.  The maximum period of probation that can be imposed in the district courts is 2 years.

Traffic Violations in the 40th District Court: Reduced to Avoid Points and Record of any Conviction!

94-696

Like other district courts in Macomb County, I would say that traffic tickets are on the top of the list of types of cases that are litigated at the 40th District Court. The presence of I-94 and I-696 contribute to the traffic volume in St. Clair Shores.  When resolving a traffic matter in the 40th District Court, we are often able to negotiate a reduction or avoid points. A substantial reduction in a traffic ticket occurs when it is reduced to an offense such as impeding traffic or double parking. A traffic ticket that is reduced to impeding traffic or double parking does not carry any points and will never appear on a person’s driving record! We are also able to get favorable results for individuals charged with misdemeanor traffic offenses such as driving while suspended, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident

Courts are making it easier than ever to just pay your traffic ticket by visiting the court’s website and conveniently providing an option to pay by credit card.  Unfortunately, most individuals that receive a traffic ticket do not hire a lawyer and wind up with a record and points that will have an impact on insurance premiums for several years. The path of least resistance, paying the ticket, can be much costlier in the long run.

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NOT GUILTY BY REASON OF SELF-DEFENSE!

Oftentimes clients call confused as to why they are being charged with domestic violence or an assault crime (assault and battery, aggravated assault, assault by strangulation, assault with a deadly weapon ) when they believe that they were acting in self-defense. A police response occurs following a report or 911 call. Once at the scene of the alleged crime, the police may take statements from one or more individuals. In most cases, it only takes the statement of a single person and no other witnesses for the police to initiate an arrest of a suspect. The police often do not take the statement of the accused party and do not always conduct a thorough investigation. In addition, the accused may have acted in self-defense which is something that the police may not fully cover in their investigation.

According to Michigan State Police statistics, there were 107,000 incidents of misdemeanor and felony assault crimes reported in 2017!

Embezzlement
In Michigan, the offense of embezzlement is a crime of opportunity which is committed by someone who is in a position of trust which includes anyone that is an employee or associated with others in a business entity such as a partner or corporate officer.  It can also include persons in unpaid positions that are entrusted with charitable proceeds to collect money for school or club functions.  In the most basic terms, embezzlement means stealing, or committing the act of larceny, during the scope of an employment situation.  Some examples of embezzlement that we have seen in our Macomb County Courts include:

  • Employee working with an outsider and failing to scan items at the point of checkout.
  • Bookkeeper that uses company credit card or checks for personal use.

ToddPendulumJPG-1344962010
When a person commits a crime that involves a victim, a number of laws apply that provide the victim with several rights. Some of these rights allow for the victim to collect restitution, be afforded a victim’s rights advocate, confer with the prosecutor regarding plea bargaining and speak at the time of sentencing to request a specific (jail) sentence.


Article 1, Section 24 of Michigan’s Constitution
provides as follows:

Crime victims, as defined by law, shall have the following rights, as provided by law: