Michigan Criminal Lawyer Blog

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In the course of the last two years there has been a noticeable increase of clients we take on because they have been charged with a fraud crime. Two things are notable about fraud clients, most have little to no criminal history and often do not realize that the charge is a felony. Felonies are always more concerning than misdemeanors because of their stiffer maximum sentences, the fact that it tracks through the Circuit Court/County probation department, can prohibit you from voting, can prohibit gun ownership, restrict your travel, make you ineligible for government assistance (IE welfare), make you ineligible for jury service, and if not a citizen will likely result in deportation. Moreover, many job applications specifically ask if prospective employees have been convicted of a felony. Even a misdemeanor fraud charge can be an awful Scarlet Letter to bear. Having to disclose that you have been in trouble for taking money that didn’t belong to you will negatively affect your ability to find work.

There is a wide range of conduct that can get somebody charged with a fraud crime. Some of these crimes are listed below. Just about anything involving the wrongful taking of somebody else’s money or credit/debit information qualifies as a felony. After the list we will outline defenses and how these cases often play out. These are very abbreviated descriptions of the offenses, for a more in depth discussion please click the links provided.

Financial transaction device: fraudulent use to withdraw or transfer funds. Using a credit card or debit card to withdraw somebody else’s money is a crime. Depending on the amount it can be a misdemeanor or a felony.
Falsification of identity to obtain financial transaction device. Using a fake ID to obtain a credit or debit card is a felony.
Furnishing goods or services – forging signatures or filling out forms. Using somebody else’s credit or debit card to purchase something is a felony. It is also a felony to sell something to such a person knowing that they have an illegal credit or debit card.
Use of revoked or canceled device. Using a revoked (versus expired) credit or debit card to obtain anything of value can be a misdemeanor or felony.
Forgery, alteration or counterfeiting. Duplicating or making changes to a debit/credit card is a felony.
Use, delivery, or circulation under unlawful circumstances. Selling a credit or debit card that belongs to somebody else is a felony. It is further a felony simply to possess somebody else’s card with the intent to sell it.
Stealing, removing, or hiding financial transaction device. Taking somebody else’s card is a felony.
Identity theft. It can be a felony to use somebody else’s personal information to commit any illegal act, specifically to make purchases.
Embezzlement. It is a crime for one who is in a position of trust to take money and convert it to personal use. Typically this is an employee who has access to company money and takes it for their own use.
Fraudulent acquisition of a prescription drug. Using false information to obtain a prescription is a crime.
Uttering and publishing. Using a forged or fraudulent check to procure goods or funds is a felony.

Our office has had success in getting fraud cases reduced to misdemeanors, dismissed, and most importantly keeping our clients out of jail. When considering the full spectrum of criminal behavior prosecutors are most concerned about violent crimes against people. A fraud crime isn’t normally the type that causes psychological trauma to the victim, so really their only loss is money. Where the victim can be made whole through repayment there can often be reductions or concessions negotiated. In a recent case involving the allegation of using someone else’s credit information, we were able to get a 4 year felony reduced to a 93 day misdemeanor which will come off the client’s record after compliance with a short probation.

Moreover, most fraud crimes require an element of intent. Where there was an accident or misunderstanding there may be a valid defense to the case. If we can present a defense theory that there was no criminal intent or intent to defraud the case can be fought on such grounds. People have been falsely charged with crimes before, and if you believe that you are innocent you should get counsel involved immediately. Our experienced litigators are not afraid to fight weak charges by motioning for dismissals and by taking issues to trial.

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Since September 30, 2003, the legal limit for operating while intoxicated in the State of Michigan has been .08 per cent or greater. Prior to that time, the legal limit was .10 per cent or greater.

According to a report on WXYZ, the legal limit of .08 percent reverts to .10 percent in October 2013 unless lawmakers in Lansing rule otherwise. Mother’s Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is lobbying to keep Michigan’s blood alcohol content law at .08 percent for individuals who operate a motor vehicle. The report headline is, “MADD calls on lawyers to keep Michigan’s BAC law at .08 percent to prevent drunk driving“. According to Republican Rep. Andrea LaFontaine of Columbus Township, Michigan must maintain its .08 percent law to avoid violating federal drunken driving standards and continue receiving federal funding. The .08 limit was adopted in every state as part of an initiative during the Clinton administration by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

It is my opinion that Michigan will retain the BAC legal limit of .08 percent.

A person who is not physically impaired or drunk can be convicted of OWI or Super Drunk!

Under Michigan law, a person is considered to be Operating While Intoxicated (OWI) or drunk driving, if he or she has a BAC of .08 per cent or greater, regardless of actual intoxication. If the BAC is .17 percent or greater, the charge is upped pursuant to Michigan’s High BAC law, also known as Super Drunk Driving. Therefore, a person can be charged and convicted of drunk driving, or Super Drunk Driving, even though the person was not impaired or drunk!

How is blood alcohol content determined?

The blood alcohol content is determined by one or more tests. The most popular test is the breath test. A common instrument to obtain a breath sample is the Datamaster. The Datamaster operator must follow complex instructions or there may be grounds to suppress the test result.

What are the consequeneces for refusal of a breath test or chemical test to determine BAC?

There are consequences when a person refuses a test to obtain his blood alcohol content pursuant to Michigan’s Implied Consent Law. A first time refusal of a chemical test will result in 6 points and license suspension for 1 year. In addition, a search warrant for a blood sample may be obtained by the police when a person refuses the chemical test offered by the arresting agency.

Are BAC charts accurate?

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From a legal standpoint, no amount of alcohol should be consumed prior to the operation of a motor vehicle. However, there are many drink/weight index charts on-line that give an estimated BAC. In addition, a portable breath test can be obtained from many sources. Again, any consumption of alcohol can be a risky proposition and is not recommended prior to the operation of a motor vehicle.

How much does a drunk driving case cost?

Here is an estimated range of fees and costs upon conviction for a first offense drunk driving:

-Attorney Fees: $2,500.00 to $25,000.00 (depending upon motions, trials, deviation requests)
-Fines/Costs: $800.00 to $2,000.00 -Driver Responsibility Fees: $1,000.00 to $2,000.00
-Substance Abuse Assessment: $150.00 -Probation Oversight Expenses: Up to $1,200.00 ($50.00 per month for max of 2 years)
-Insurance: (See Link) $3,000.00 to $6,000.00 per year for 5 years -Alcohol Counseling: $1,000.00 -Other Possible Costs: Vehicle immobilization, costs of prosecution, municipal/police response costs, vehicle forfeiture
It is imperative that a person charged with drunk driving retain a lawyer as soon as possible. An experienced lawyer will often know when a drunk driving conviction can be avoided or what action needs to be taken to get the best results and avoid many of the harsh consequences associated with a drunk driving conviction.

The ABDO LAW FIRM has been actively representing clients charged with drunk driving in every Macomb County court since 1980.
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Far too often when we are retained for a criminal case, domestic violence, assault crime or drunk driving, a client is also charged with one of the following Michigan felony cases:

These crimes consistently are listed in the top 50 felony cases in Michigan.

Even a simple traffic stop, retail fraud or possession of marijuana offense can lead to egregious consequences when someone attempts to escape or engage in a struggle with the police. Unfortunately, the police may charge a person with resisting or obstruction when they misread the conduct of a person. This is sometimes the case when a person makes abrupt physical movements during an arrest which are interpreted as obstructive or assaultive conduct.

The State of Michigan classifies all resisting or obstruction and fleeing and eluding crimes as felonies! The penalties for conduct which qualifies as resisting, obstructing, assaulting, fleeing or eluding the police are classified according to seriousness of the crime. The seriousness of the crime will depend upon whether an injury or death has occurred.

Maximum Michigan Criminal Penalties for Resisting and Obstructing

  • No injury or death: 2 years or a fine of not more than $2,000.00, or both.
  • Bodily injury requiring medical attention or care: 4 years or a fine of not more than $5,000.00, or both.
  • Serious impairment of a body function: 10 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00, or both.
  • Causes the death of an individual: 20 years or a fine of not more than $20,000.00, or both.

Maximum Michigan Criminal Penalties for Fleeing and Eluding

In addition to suspension or revocation of the driver license of a person convicted of fleeing and eluding, the following criminal penalties apply:

  • Fourth Degree: No injury or death: 2 years or a fine of not more than $2,000.00, or both.
  • Third Degree: 5 years or a fine of not more than $5,000.00, or both, if 1 or more of the following circumstances apply:
  • the violation results in a collision or accident, the violation occurred in an area where the speed limit is 35 miles an hour or less or the individual has a prior conviction for 4th degree fleeing and eluding, including attempt.

  • Second Degree: 10 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00, or both, if 1 or more of the following circumstances apply: the violation results in serious impairment of a body function, or the individual has 1 or more prior convictions for 1st, 2nd or 3rd degree fleeing and eluding, including attempt.
  • First Degree: If the violation results in the death of another individual, 15 years or a fine of not more than $15,000.00, or both.

How to Respond when Confronted By the Police

When the police respond to a 9-1-1 call, pull over a motor vehicle or are acting upon a warrant for an arrest, they are placed in a potentially risky situation. The immediate goal of law enforcement officers is to secure the location by identifying parties that pose a threat or need to be isolated until witness statements can be obtained. The police are not involved in the “guilt or innocence” aspects of the case at this junction. For this reason, if you are confronted by the police, try to remain calm to avoid misunderstandings and confusion that could be construed as obstructive. As criminal defense lawyers, we have found that rational, polite, cooperative conduct can act in favor of someone facing criminal charges. By cooperation, I do not mean that you should “spill the beans”. Keep in mind that aside from providing identification, a person does not have to make any statements and has an absolute right to remain silent. You Tube Video Link: Don’t Talk to the Police. It is the job of a criminal defense lawyer to obtain the police reports, do an investigation and prepare a defense strategy for a client charged with a crime such as fleeing, eluding, resisting or obstructing.

What Factors Do Attorneys Consider When Defending Someone Charged With Resisting, Obstructing, Fleeing and Eluding?

When a client is charged with resisting or obstruction and/or fleeing and eluding, our first concern is whether anyone was injured. Assuming an injury did not occur, negotiations can usually go smoothly and our goal is to resolve the case by avoiding a felony conviction. Negotiations are much more complex when a law enforcement officer or our client sustains an injury. When a client is injured, he or she may be contemplating a civil lawsuit against the police or filing an internal complaint with the police department. Civil litigation will invariably lead the government to avoid plea bargaining as it will aggressively attempt to protect itself from damages and protect the integrity of the law enforcement agency involved. Since these scenarios will usually thwart any attempt to seek an amicable resolution of the case, the advice of a skilled criminal defense lawyer and a personal injury lawyer are crucial!

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Oftentimes clients call confused as to why they are being charged with an assaultive crime (assault and battery, domestic violence, etc.) when they believed that they were acting in self-defense. The police have to respond to allegations of violence, and where somebody alleges that they were attacked that will generally be sufficient to get a case brought into court. Sometimes one party will be charged (often the case) and other times both will.

Self-defense is one of the most common defenses in criminal law, and where the defense is successfully put forth it negates a crime of violence. Where we can show that our client acted in self-defense, the prosecution then faces a greater burden at trial. The prosecution must then show beyond a reasonable doubt that the assaultive crime occurred and moreover show beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant didn’t act in self-defense. The following elements must be shown in order to establish a valid self-defense claim.

1) The defendant must have truthfully believed that the aggressor was going to use physical force against him, her, or a third person. So long as non-lethal force was applied the defendant need not have believed the aggressor was using deadly force.
2) Objectively, the belief of an imminent attack on the defendant must be reasonable. This means that neutrally looking at the defendant’s actions his or her belief that force was going to be used was a rational belief.
3)
The defendant honestly thought the amount of force used was appropriate.
4) Objectively, somebody would find that the defendant used an appropriate amount of force.

This is a pretty classic objective/subjective test – meaning that it must be shown the defendant thought his or her actions were reasonable and further that they were objectively reasonable. If the above elements are shown, self-defense is established, and the defendant is not guilty of the assault crime. Nonetheless, if prosecution shows the following, a self-defense case will fail.

1) That the belief of force or force used by the defendant was unreasonable.
2) That the defendant was the initial aggressor.
3) There was an agreement by both parties to enter into a fight.
4) If more force than necessary was used by the defendant to subdue the initial aggressor.

The following are factors that our office will evaluate in building a self defense case;

1) The relative size of the aggressor to the victim;
2) If the aggressor has a history of violence;
3) Any military or martial arts training;
4) The presence/threat of a weapon;
5) Whether there were multiple aggressors;
6) Social media activity including taunts/threats;
7) And/or prior threats by the aggressor.

Practically speaking what does this mean? The defendant must not have started the fight, must have honestly thought he or she was about to be attacked, and used only enough force to protect him or herself. Oftentimes people being charged with assault DO have valid self-defense claims. If you are being charged with such a crime you would be wise to contact an attorney to discuss the circumstances of your case and evaluate the merits of a possible self-defense claim.

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Our experience tells us that the most prevalent misdemeanor crimes which are prosecuted in the Macomb County District Courts by crime type are as follows:

Possession of Marijuana
Domestic Violence
Retail Fraud
Driving While License Suspended
Operating While Intoxicated
Disorderly Conduct

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A recent docket of cases in a Macomb County District Court
Fortunately, these common misdemeanors are manageable from the point of view of our criminal defense lawyers. Again, our experience is based upon handling 1000’s of misdemeanor cases in all of the Macomb County District Courts.

When we refer to Macomb County District Courts, we are referring to:

37th District Court: Warren 38th District Court: Eastpointe 39th District Court: Roseville, Fraser 40th District Court: St. Clair Shores 41-A District Court: Sterling Heights
41-A District Court: Shelby Township, Macomb Township, City of Utica 42-1 District Court: Romeo 42-2 District Court: New Baltimore, Chesterfield Township
Specific Provisions of Michigan Laws to Obtain Dismissals of Domestic Violence and Possession of Marijuana and Non-Public Record

In Michigan, there are distinct provisions of law designated for the crimes of Possession of Marijuana and and Domestic Violence to obtain a dismissal and suppression of the public record without going to trial. Our blog pages and web site contain several references to these provisions of law which may be linked as follows:

Domestic Violence: Michigan Compiled Laws 769.4a
Possession of Marijuana: Michigan Compiled Laws 333.7411

Delayed Sentencing and Dismissal of Retail Fraud and Disorderly Conduct Cases (also can be used for other misdemeanors and felonies)

There is also a delayed sentence law which is found at MCL 771.1. This law is a general provision which can be used for any criminal offense. Basically, it allows the Judge to delay the sentence and fashion a result or disposition that the offender can earn after a period of probation. Our criminal defense lawyers have utilized this provision of law extensively for numerous misdemeanor offenses including the commonly charged offenses of Retail Fraud and Disorderly Conduct. There are certain formalities to gain the benefit of a dismissal pursuant to MCL 771.1. Our criminal defense attorneys negotiate a plea bargain for application of MCL 771.1 with the prosecutor for a delayed sentence at a pretrial conference with the component of a dismissal after a period of probation. The Judge has the final say regarding acceptance of the usage of MCL 771.1 and whether dismissal will be provided at a future delayed sentencing date. For information, click here for a link to the blog page which pertains to Retail Fraud charges.

Operating While Intoxicated and Driving While License Suspended

The use or operation of a motorized vehicle is an essential element of the misdemeanor crimes of Driving While License Suspended and Operating While Intoxicated. Possession of marijuana does not require the use of an automobile for the crime to occur. However, possession of marijuana cases often are the end result of a traffic stop after the police officer smells marijuana or obtains consent to search the vehicle or the occupant. We don’t always agree with the police methods utilized to obtain consent to search which may involve subtle threats to get a search warrant or to call in the drug sniffing dogs.

Driving While License Suspended and Operating While Intoxicated do not fit neatly into a special provision of law which allows for outright dismissals after a period of probation and compliance. In my opinion, you can thank the insurance industry for legislation that does not allow an offender to obtain expungement of a traffic offense or traffic related crime such as Driving While License Suspended or Operating While Intoxicated. Nonetheless, we are often able to obtain reductions of both Driving While License Suspended and Operating While Intoxicated to minimize points, fines, driver responsibility fees, license sanctions and other sentencing consequences.
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This year, we have published several blogs dedicated to “frequently asked (criminal law) questions”. Whenever possible, we endeavor to avoid legalese by providing articles in layman’s terms. The focus of this blog is pretrial conferences in Macomb County District Courts.

What is a pretrial conference?

A pretrial conference is a meeting that is attended by the attorneys for the parties in a criminal or civil case. The major purposes of a pretrial conference are to facilitate resolution of a case, management of a case for trial or management of a case regarding pertinent issues (as listed below). A pretrial conference is scheduled after either a criminal or civil case is filed with the court, a case number and a Judge are assigned. In Macomb County, criminal pretrial conferences are held soon after the arraignment. For misdemeanors, which occur in Macomb County, the pretrial conference will always be held at the district court (click here for complete listing of links to Macomb County District Courts). Felony pretrial conferences can occur on the date scheduled for a preliminary examination and again after the case is bound over to the circuit court. A person charged with a crime (the defendant) is required to be present on the date scheduled for pretrial conference. However, he or she is usually not allowed in the conference room with the attorneys. On the other hand, police officers and victim’s rights advocates with court business are allowed in the conference room. Likewise, an alleged victim may be present at the pretrial conference as the prosecutor must obtain the victim’s consent for a plea bargain in most criminal cases.

The direction of a criminal case is often determined after a pretrial conference. Pretrial conferences are a vital tool, which a skilled criminal defense lawyer will utilize for several reasons:

  • Promote dismissal of the charge(s) under certain circumstances
  • Negotiate a favorable plea bargain
  • Address bond, bond conditions and/or release from jail
  • Adjourn the pretrial conference to seek a deviation when strict policy obstructs a plea bargain
  • Request modification of no-contact order (domestic violence cases)
  • Negotiate restitution when financial losses are claimed
  • Meet with the Judge when judicial support is needed to discuss various matters, such as sentence bargains, creative plea bargains or to simplify issues of the case when set for trial
  • Size up the prosecution’s case, witnesses and evidence
  • Request copies of discovery (police reports, videos, chemical test results)
  • Schedule one or more motion dates to attack the evidence, or to weaken the case
  • Set future pretrial conference date(s) when delay can tend to improve the defense position
  • Schedule the case for a bench or jury trial

Factoid: A person who is accused of a crime is not considered a “defendant” until that person is formally charged with a crime. Our criminal defense lawyers never refer to our clients as “defendants” when speaking to the court or prosecutor because of negative connotations. We prefer to refer to our clients by their given name or “the accused”.

What is the attorney’s role at a pretrial conference?

The best way for me to summarize an attorney’s role at a pretrial conference is by mentioning a few passages from the Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct.

A lawyer is a representative of clients, an officer of the legal system and a public citizen having special responsibility for the quality of justice.

As advocate, a lawyer zealously asserts the client’s position under the rules of the adversary system.

As negotiator, a lawyer seeks a result advantageous to the client but consistent with requirements of honest dealing with others.

What is the defendant’s role at a pretrial conference?

Macomb County (as well as Oakland, Wayne and St.Clair), require the attendance of the defendant at the pretrial conference. If the defendant “fails to appear”, an arrest warrant may be issued. Prior to the pretrial conference, our criminal defense attorneys discuss goals and/or strategies with our clients. Even though the defendant is not present in the conference room, he or she is well informed of our intentions. We advise our clients to be punctual, dress appropriately and to refrain from discussing their case with anyone at the courthouse. We assume that our client’s conduct is “being monitored”. Therefore, we discourage any interaction with the victim or any conduct which draws unfavorable attention. Any progress towards working out a deal can be blown if a client offends certain key decision makers at the pretrial conference or at any other time while a criminal case is pending!

Is there an appearance in the courtroom after the pretrial conference?

After the pretrial conference, the defendant and his or her attorney will appear in open court and inform the Judge of the results. The Judge has the final say regarding the outcome of a pretrial conference. For example, certain plea bargains may be against the Judge’s own policy and may require some persuasion and legal authority. In addition, the Judge may show frustration when the parties are attempting to adjourn (delay) cases. Since adjournments tend to clog court dockets, the Judge will require that “good cause” be shown.

Our experience is that a pretrial conference is an invaluable opportunity to advocate on behalf of our clients. Advocacy includes elements of assertiveness and diplomacy. We often can achieve a disposition after the pretrial conference. This may result in a plea bargain, which may have the effect of dismissing the criminal charges in exchange for completion of probation. It is our job to protect our client’s rights and seek the best possible outcome, which may mean saving a client from being exposed to egregious facts and the expenses of an unnecessary trial. The defendant remains the ultimate decision-maker when presented with options after the conclusion of a pretrial conference.

Some other important things to know about pretrial conferences:

-Denial of a pretrial conference may constitute a denial of “due process” rights. US vs. Ataya, 864 F2d 1324 (1988)
-No admissions made by the defendant’s lawyer in the setting of a pretrial conference are admissible against the defendant during trial.
-Pretrial Conferences for federal criminal cases are governed by Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 17.1

The addresses and phone numbers for all Macomb County district courts can be found at the following links:


Warren 37th District Court

Eastpointe 38th District Court

Roseville and Fraser 39th District Court

St. Clair Shores 40th District Court

Sterling Heights 41-A District Court

Shelby, Utica and Macomb Township 41-A District Court

Clinton Township, Mt. Clemens, Harrison Township 41-B District Court

Romeo, Washington Township, Armada, Bruce Township, Ray Township, Richmond, Memphis 42-1 District Court

New Baltimore, Chesterfield Township, Lenox Township, New Haven 42-2 District Court

Court-Gavel.jpg What is a plea bargain?

Simply stated, a plea is where a finding of guilt is made through an admission rather than by a judge or jury. Usually this means that in exchange for dismissed charges, reduced charges, a deferral, or for an offer of leniency the defendant explains the crime that they committed to the judge. When a plea is made the defendant gives up his or her right to have a trial and all the rights they would have at trial. This expedites the criminal justice process because it skips the trial portion and the case is fast-tracked for sentencing after the defendant admits to the charged conduct. It is a ‘bargain’ because the defendant must compromise by dispensing with his or her trial rights in exchange for a deal of some sort.

Why do plea bargains exist?

Plea bargains are commonplace in the United States and many would argue are necessary for the smooth operation of our justice system. Some 90% of cases are worked out through plea bargains. In addition to (most the time) benefiting defendants, they benefit the court and prosecution because trials are also costly and arduous for them. With most courts having full dockets, the system would come to a crawl if each case was resolved with a lengthy trial.

What are the most common types of plea bargains?

The most common type of plea arrangements are charge bargains, sentence bargains, sentence recommendations, and what is called a ‘Cobbs plea.’ A charge bargain, which is totally within the discretion of the prosecutor, is a bargain whereby a plea deal is offered in exchange for reduced or dismissed charges . Another type of plea is a sentence agreement. This is where the prosecutor conditions the plea on a term of sentence (for example the prosecutor may recommend a statute that keeps the charge off the defendant’s record). In this type of plea the defendant retains the right to withdraw his plea if the judge does not abide by the prosecutor’s agreement. Along the same vein are sentence recommendations. As we always explain to clients, recommendations are not binding on the judge. However, experience tells us that a judge will more likely than not go along with a prosecutor’s endorsement. Lastly, there are ‘Cobbs pleas’, given their name after the case People v. Cobbs. This is a bargained for sentence with the judge, if the judge exceeds that preliminarily agreed upon sentence the plea may be withdrawn.

What helps for negotiating a favorable plea deal?

Many factors play into negotiating a favorable plea deal. Oftentimes considerations include the defendant’s criminal history, personal background, and the prosecution’s evidence. A clean or limited criminal record always helps at the negotiating table. Similarly, factors such as steady employment, education, and a positive family background tend to be viewed as a encouraging. In terms of the case’s facts, presenting scant evidence of a crime or its elements to the prosecutor can also help in working an advantageous plea.

Doesn’t a plea mean the crime will go on my record?

We get this question a lot – the answer is not necessarily. Frequently, the entire purpose of taking a plea deal is because it is conditioned on some type of deferral (or a deal whereby the charge will be removed from the client’s record). These deferrals are discussed at length on our blog and website. For purposes of this blog it is sufficient to know the common deferrals are available for youthful offenders, domestic violence cases, drug cases, and MIPs . There is also a general deferral under the delayed sentence statute.
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This is another segment in a series of blogs which is dedicated to provide answers to frequently asked legal questions related to criminal law. If you are charged with a crime (felony or misdemeanor) you may be arrested on an outstanding warrant or receive a notice from the court or police directing you to personally surrender yourself to the police or to appear at court.

Our Macomb County criminal defense lawyers get asked this question all the time: What should I do if there is a warrant for my arrest?

A criminal arrest warrant is a written court order directing for the arrest and detention of a person. If you have received notice or have knowledge that there is a warrant for your arrest, it is just a matter of time before you will be arrested. When a warrant is issued (signed by the judge), the court may send a notice to the party (criminal defendant) for a hearing (arraignment) to address the issue of bond or detention of the defendant while a criminal case is pending. If someone receives a notice (from the court or police) regarding the existence of a warrant or has other knowledge of an active warrant, an attorney should be retained immediately to arrange a court date and have the warrant cancelled and bond determined. This is the best case scenario to resolve a warrant.

What if I am arrested on a warrant before I can call my lawyer?

If you are arrested based upon a warrant, you will not have the luxury of walking into a courtroom with a lawyer to answer the warrant. However, you can make matters worse by resisting the police or acting disorderly. Any resistance to the warrant may lead to additional criminal charges such as resisting and obstructing or fleeing and eluding. Our criminal defense attorneys give clients the following advice regarding possible arrest and dealing with law enforcement officers when faced with an arrest warrant:

NOTICE TO OUR CLIENTS:
In most cases, our law office will be notified or you will receive a notice if a warrant is issued against you. However, if you are arrested, please remain calm and cooperative with the police. Do not resist the police or act disorderly as this will only make matters worse and will lead to other criminal charges (resisting and obstructing). Our office advises that you to refrain from making any verbal or written statements to the police pursuant to your absolute right to remain silent. However, you should be prepared to provide identification. Following your arrest, you will be booked by the police and detained until your arraignment. Please have a family member contact our office if you are arrested and in all likelihood, we will visit you at jail and have an attorney present in the courtroom at the time of your arraignment. If you are brought before the court before you or a family member can contact our office, enter a plea of NOT GUILTY or STAND MUTE and let the judge know that you have retained a lawyer.

When should I hire a lawyer?

In some cases, you may not know about a criminal investigation that will lead to an arrest warrant. In most cases, the police will contact you during a criminal investigation in an attempt to get a confession or written statement. You should refrain from making any statements to the police. If you are contacted by the police, get the detective’s or police officer’s name and phone number. You should hire an attorney as soon as you have knowledge that there is a criminal investigation or if you believe that you have committed a crime and will be arrested. An attorney can contact the detective in charge of your case and ask to be notified when the warrant is issued. An attorney can also try to get some facts from the detective, and advance a defense strategy on behalf of the suspected party. In addition, an attorney can advise the detective that a client will not be making any statements and also address other pressing legal issues such as cooperation.

Link: Searches with warrants

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The Michigan Bar Association releases crime data for the state from time to time. While researching cases, we came across an informative article written by the Michigan Bar Association regarding the most frequently charged felonies in the State of Michigan. This article can be viewed here: Top 50 Felonies Most Frequently Charged in Michigan. Based upon our experience, I would agree: this list is an accurate representation of the types of cases that our Macomb County criminal defense firm handles on a frequent basis.

Listed below is a selection of the top felonies charged in Michigan:
Possession of a Controlled Substance (heroin, cocaine, analogues)
• Possession of Marijuana (double penalty for second offense)
• Possession of methamphetamine (MDMA)
Possession with intent to deliver less than 50 grams (cocaine, narcotic)
• Possession of an Analogue controlled substance (pills)
• Possession with intent to deliver marijuana • Manufacturer or delivery of less than 5 kilograms of marijuana • Drunk driving – 3rd offense
• Assault with Dangerous/Deadly Weapon (“Felonious Assault”)
Assault with Intent to do Great Bodily Harm
• Resist/Obstruct a Police Officer & fleeing and eluding • Criminal Sexual Conduct – 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Degree • Keeping or Maintaining Drug House • Home Invasion
• Retail Fraud 1st Degree (Retail Fraud 2nd and 3rd Degree are misdemeanors)
• Larceny in a Building, Larceny from a Vehicle
Sometimes, the amount of loss will determine whether an offense is classified as a felony. Offenses, such as embezzlement and malicious destruction of property, are also on the list of top felonies when the value is $1,000.00 or greater. If the value of stolen property was less than $1,000.00, the offense would qualify as a misdemeanor.

Pursuant to the Michigan Sentencing Guidelines, felonies are further broken down into categories that determine the accompanying sentence. Punishment for each class is listed below:
• Class A – Life imprisonment • Class B – Up to 20 years in prison • Class C – Up to 15 years in prison • Class D – Up to 10 years in prison • Class E – Up to 5 years in prison • Class F – Up to 4 years in prison • Class G – Up to 2 years in prison • Class H – Jail or other intermediate sanctions, such as fines
Note: A future blog will be dedicated to the Michigan Sentencing Guidelines.

Below, you will find connections to some of our blogs that are pertinent to felony cases:

All Felony-related Posts

Drug Possession

Felony Assault – Assault with a Deadly Weapon

Fleeing, Eluding and Obstructing the Police

First Degree Retail Fraud and Larceny

Third Drunk Driving Conviction

Child Abuse and Neglect

Felony Marijuana Possession
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In this concluding portion of our series, we will discuss illegal searches as they relate to an individual’s home. The following will serve as a paradigm for exploring police searches of the home;

Were the police allowed to enter the home?
Were the police allowed to search the home?
What was the scope of the permissible search within the hom
e?

The 4th Amendment provides the most safeguards to people in their homes. This stems from colonial America and is one of the foundational principles of the Bill of Rights. The 4th Amendment is premised on the idea that the home is one’s castle and the government cannot enter it unless there is good reason to do so. Searches of the home can be separated into two categories, searches with and without warrants. A search absent a warrant is presumptively unreasonable. Without a warrant, police can only search somebody’s home if there is exception to the warrant rule. However, this is one the situations in law where it is said the exception swallows the rule.

Searches WITH Warrants

This post will discuss two types of warrants, search warrants and arrest warrants. Arrest warrants will be discussed more as an exception to the warrant rule. A search warrant must be based on probable cause. Probable cause is presented via affidavit which must be signed by a judge or magistrate. Warrants can be defective on the grounds they are ‘stale‘, or based on old information. They can further be defective on the grounds of scope and specificity. There needs to be some guidance as to what can be seized in order to limit officers’ discretion. However, it can sometimes be difficult to challenge warrants because of the “good faith exception”, often preventing the suppression of evidence where an improper warrant was relied on in good faith.

Searches WITHOUT Warrants
The major recognized exceptions to the warrant requirements are;

1) Consent (standing),
2) Exigent circumstances,
3) Emergency aid,
4) Search incident to arrest,
5) And plain view.

The police may enter a home where there is consent that is freely given. However, from a legal standpoint one must have standing (or the authority) to give consent. Somebody must be more than just a temporary guest in order to give the police permission to search somebody’s home (an overnight guest, however, is sufficient). Where there is an immediate and pressing interest in preserving evidence, protecting police/the public, or preventing a suspect from escaping police can enter a home under the ‘exigent circumstances‘ doctrine. Where there is a reasonable belief that somebody is in need of medical attention police may enter a dwelling. However, police must have more than ‘speculation that someone inside side may have been injured’ in order to justify a warrantless intrusion under this doctrine. As stated above, where an arrest warrant has issued police may enter a home to effectuate that arrest without a separate warrant. This does not allow the police to enter a third party’s home and further they will be limited to only conducting a protective sweep within the home. Where a police officer is positioned somewhere he/she is legally allowed to be and can see evidence of a crime that officer can seize the item. The example that is often given is where police sees evidence of a crime through a window, absent an exception, they must still obtain a warrant to enter the home.
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